Malorie Schaus
CEPS Staff

Malorie Schaus

Researcher

Malorie Schaus
About

Malorie Schaus

Researcher

Dr. Malorie Schaus is a Researcher at the GRID Unit of CEPS and Coordinator of the Hidden Treasures Programme and the Task Force on the New Industrial Strategy for Europe.

Her research interests cover EU and international trade and investment law and economics, including geo-economics and global collective action problems, the WTO dispute settlement system and international arbitration, as well as EU competition law and economics, and European company law and corporate governance.

Prior to joining CEPS, she has worked as a company lawyer defending the interests of Belgian companies on company law, corporate governance and competition law matters, and as a representative to the OECD Belgian National Contact Point (NCP). She has furthermore built experience through diverse internships at the European and international levels: in working on the DSU negotiations and the China – Rare Earths case at the Legal Affairs Division of the World Trade Organization (WTO), on the ICT policy review of Egypt and cyberlaws in developing countries at the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), on a preliminary ruling regarding a state aids case and European case law on environmental issues in the chambers of Judge Jean-Jacques Kasel at the Court of Justice of the European Union, and on competition law as a summer associate at Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP.

She graduated in law from the University of Liège (Belgium) and the University of Maastricht (The Netherlands). She earned a LL.M. in International Economic Law from the Graduate Institute in Geneva (Switzerland). Her LL.M. dissertation ‘Monetary Protectionism and International Economic Law – The China Case’ critically assesses the consistency of the alleged undervaluation of the renminbi with IMF’s Articles of Agreement and relevant WTO law.

Malorie Schaus holds a Ph.D. in WTO law from the European University Institute in Florence (Italy). As part of her doctoral studies, she has been a Visiting Researcher at Harvard Law School. Her Ph.D. thesis critically examines the concept of ‘measure’ in WTO law. It demonstrates that the ‘measure’ in WTO law is best conceived as a stabilizing concept grafted onto the substance of specific GATT/WTO legal obligations in terms of aim and effects throughout the judicial proceedings, in line with its essence as enshrined in the DSU and the fundamental WTO principle of security and predictability, beyond the predominant open approach to the ‘measure’ in WTO law based on its form. In this respect, her Ph.D. thesis adopts an interdisciplinary perspective: WTO substantive law, specifically the GATT and TBT Agreement, as informed by a politico-economic perspective; WTO’s dispute settlement system and procedural features, specifically the panel request, as informed by a distinctive doctrinal perspective; the distinctive features but also the constructive interactions between substance and procedure based on the judicial reasoning of the WTO adjudicating bodies.

Ph.D. in WTO law from the European University Institute in Florence (Italy)