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Banking fragility rooted in justice failures Evidence from Ukraine
Policy Contribution

Europeanization and Conflict Resolution: Case Studies from the European Periphery

by Bruno Coppieters / Michel Huysseune / Tamara Kovziridze / Gergana Noutcheva / Nathalie Tocci / Michael Emerson / Marius Vahl
01 October 2004

Europeanization and Conflict Resolution: Case Studies from the European Periphery

Bruno Coppieters / Michel Huysseune / Tamara Kovziridze / Gergana Noutcheva / Nathalie Tocci / Michael Emerson / Marius Vahl

The enlarging EU is increasingly drawn into secessionist conflicts on its southern and eastern peripheries. This book examines the relevance of European integration for conflict settlement and resolution in divided states through a comparison of four case studies: Cyprus, Serbia and Montenegro, Moldova and the Transnistrian conflict and the Georgia-Abkhaz conflict.
The authors explore the historical background of each of these conflicts and examine the degree of Europeanization, the mediation attempts made by international security organizations, and the way in which efforts to resolve these conflicts have been linked to closer integration into the EU and other European organizations. Funded by the Belgian Federal Science Policy Office, this publication is the result of a collaborative research project undertaken by CEPS and the Department of Political Science of the Free University of Brussels (VUB).
Price: € 8.50 in paperback from Academia Press, 2004
Also available for free download from website of Journal of Ethnopolitics and Minority Issues in Europe.


About the Authors


  • Author
    Bruno Coppieters
    Bruno Coppieters
  • Author
    Michel Huysseune
    Michel Huysseune
  • Author
    Tamara Kovziridze
    Tamara Kovziridze
  • Author
    Gergana Noutcheva
    Gergana Noutcheva
  • Author
    Nathalie Tocci
    Nathalie Tocci
  • Author
    Michael Emerson
    Michael Emerson
  • Author
    Marius Vahl
    Marius Vahl
Europeanization and Conflict Resolution: Case Studies from the European Periphery