Saturday | 26 Sep 2020
Conference is over

Quantifying the Brain Drain

Migration and asylum

When
Wednesday
Where
CEPS Conference room
Place du Congrès 1, Brussels, Belgium

Participation in this event is exceptionally free of charge.

Conference

Quantifying the Brain Drain

Evidence from Sub-Saharan Africa

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According to the latest results of the continent-wide Afrobarometer survey, more than a quarter of African citizens consider emigrating to Europe. This inclination to emigrate is particularly pronounced among the young, which translates into a risk of ‘brain drain’, the emigration of the highly-educated that depletes the stock of human capital in the sending countries. A vital question for the future of EU-Africa migration policies is therefore to understand whether migration is more likely to benefit or to harm the African countries of emigration. Is it however possible that migration prospects increase educational aspirations in Africa? If so, do migration opportunities to Europe always decrease the stock of human capital in the sending countries? Can policies be designed such that migration of the highly educated becomes a win-win situation for Africa and Europe?

Some answers will be provided during the next MEDAM Seminar with Romuald Méango, who is a post-doctoral researcher at the Munich Center for the Economics of Aging. Romuald will present recent findings of his research on the selection into emigration, the incentive of would-be migrants to obtain more education, and the net effects of emigration from the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ghana and Senegal to Europe.

The presentation will be followed by a discussion of the results and possible implications for EU and national policymakers in the area of migration. A live stream will be available during the event.

Please click here for full agenda

Registration from 15.30 – Meeting from 16.00 to 17.30

Host
Andreas Backhaus Andreas Backhaus
Andreas Backhaus

Research Fellow

Speakers list
Romuald Méango

Post-Doctoral Researcher, Munich Center for the Economics of Aging