When to take a risk: Why do African Migrants Undertake Risky Migration? Evidence from Gambia

Irregular migration to Europe through the sea, though risky, remains one of the most popular migration options for many Sub-Saharan Africans. Policymakers have scaled up their efforts to deter potential migrants from embarking on this dangerous route. However, these efforts must address the relevant factors in the decision-making process of the potential migrants. Do the latter actually know how risky their intended voyage is? Do they have realistic expectations regarding their chances of being granted asylum after their arrival? If not, are their migration intentions affected by more accurate information? 
These questions will be addressed at the next MEDAM Seminar with Catia Batista, Professor of Economics at the Nova School of Business and Economics in Lisbon. Prof. Batista will present recent findings of her research on the incentives to migrate in face of a risky migration route and uncertain asylum prospects. Her empirical analysis draws on a lab-in-the-field experiment conducted in rural Gambia.
The presentation will be followed by a discussion of the results and possible implications for EU and national policymakers in the area of migration.

Please click here for the full agenda 

Professor Batista's website  http://www.catiabatista.org

Registration from 10.30 - meeting from 11.00 to 12.15 followed by a sandwich lunch

5
February 2019
Tuesday
11:00-12:15

1478

Speakers

Catia Batista
Professor, Nova School of Business and Economics

Chair

Andreas Backhaus
Research Fellow, CEPS

When to take a risk: Why do African Migrants Undertake Risky Migration? Evidence from Gambia

Contact: 
Organiser: 
5
February 2019
Tuesday
11:00-12:15
Participation in this event is exceptionally free of charge. A sandwich lunch will be served from 12.15 onwards.

1478

CEPS Conference room

Place du Congrès 1 - 1000 Brussels