CEPS climate change contributions at Copenhagen

Open Letter by Jason Handerson, WWF, Christian Egenhofer, CEPS, and Duncan Freeman, BIICS to the Members of the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety Committee of the European Parliament on Differences between key developing countries in the context of a global climate agreement

Side Events at COP15

“Future Flexible Mechanisms” - CEPS side event at Copenhagen
Thursday, 10 December 2009, 16:30-18:00

The objective of the side event was to present the newly published CEPS Task Force report on : “Flexible Mechanisms in Support of a New Climate Change Regime: The Clean Development Mechanism and beyond” (see below). The meeting, attended by nearly 300 delegates, was chaired by Bo Kjellén, former chief climate negotiator for Sweden and Senior Research Fellow at the Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI).
The event has also been webcasted on demand on the UNFCCC website. Click here to see the video.
Click here to see the slides of the presentation by CEPS Research Fellow Noriko Fujiwara.
Click here to see the slides of Mr. Simone Mori, ENEL at the side event.
 

Copies of a draft CEPS report by Noriko Fujiwara and Christian Egenhofer, entitled “The Role of Industry in Sectoral Approaches”, were also distributed at this event. The report was prepared as part of a larger grant project on Global Sectoral Approaches as part of the post-2012 Framework, awarded by the Enterprise and Industry DG of the European Commission.

"Getting Serious about 2030 Targets" - ECP side event at Copenhagen
Saturday, 12 December 2009, 15:30-17:30

The objective of the side event was to discuss the need for longer-term targets than 2030 within the EU and other Parties to enhance predictability and thereby create incentives for low-carbon technologies investment. Svante Bodin, Senior Policy Advisor at the Swedish Ministry of the Environment delivered the keynote address at the event.

Private sector engagement in the international climate change policy process’- WBCSD-Ecofys-Climate Focus side event at Copenhagen 

Saturday, 12 December 2009, 15;30-17:30

 

The objective of this side event was to present the overview of an EU study to identify how the international climate change policy process can leverage private sector expertise and engagement, and provide an opportunity for open discussion and feedback. CEPS Fellow Noriko Fujiwara participated as a panelist, introducing key messages of the draft CEPS report entitled “The Role of Industry in Sectoral Approaches”. CEPS Task Forces’ contribution to EU policy research and recommendations was also highlighted.

Publications

Taxing Carbon at the border?
The European Union has been a pioneer in combating global climate change through its emissions trading system (ETS), which puts a price on greenhouse gas emissions by assigning emissions allowances that can be traded within the EU. But most other large countries do not price carbon, thereby placing EU industry at a disadvantage. A new study carried out by a team of CEPS experts in trade and climate change, led by Daniel Gros and Christian Egenhofer, explores the question whether it would make sense for the EU to impose a ‘carbon border tax’? Click here to download the executive summary.

Flexible Mechanisms in Support of a New Climate Change Regime: The Clean Development Mechanism and beyond
It is assumed that flexible mechanisms will play a crucial role in facilitating a positive outcome in the UN climate change negotiations in Copenhagen in December 2009. A new CEPS Task Force Report, by CEPS Research Fellow Noriko Fujiwara, outlines the various motives behind flexible mechanisms and takes stock of the experience acquired to date with a view to recommending key features of future mechanisms and providing clarity on questions related to investors’ access and more predictability about investment conditions. Click here to download the executive summary.

For a Future Sustainable, Competitive and Greener EU Budget: Integrating the Climate Change Objectives
A new CEPS report warns that a lukewarm integration of climate objectives into the new EU budget and the continuation of a rather uninspiring set of budgetary actions will only damage the image of the EU institutions and send the wrong signal to EU citizens and international partners. The result of deliberations within a CEPS Task Force, the report argues that the reform of the EU budget must take stock of pressing global concerns over the financial meltdown and the worldwide food crisis, in addition to directly addressing the very real prospect of climate change. Click here to download the executive summary.

For info contact Christian Egenhofer cegenhofer@ceps.eu +32 477 34 21 49

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