Social welfare policies


121 - 150 of 197
01 August 2005

This paper studies the determinants of the retirement transitions of Europeans and focuses on the impact of social security systems on retirement behaviour. The analysis uses the first eight waves (1994-2001) of the European Community Household Panel. Based on these survey data, option values – which express, for each retirement age, the trade-off between retiring now and keeping the option open for some later retirement date – are constructed for each sampled individual in three countries: Finland, Belgium and Germany.

01 August 2005

Is health good for the economy of the European Union? This study reviews an extensive body of research and policy documents from high-income countries encompassing cost-of-illness studies; the impact of health at the individual and household level on labour market outcomes, education and saving; the impact of health on the level and the growth rate of national income; and the welfare impact of health. Based on the available evidence, the introductory question can be answered with a resounding ‘yes’: health is good for the economy in the European Union.

01 July 2005

This paper explores the consequences of pension reforms in Western Europe in a world economy setting. Whereas various economic and social consequences of population ageing have been investigated in OECD countries, very few analyses have explicitly taken the worldwide aspect of the problem into account. In order to do so, this report relies on the latest version of the INGENUE World Model (2).

01 July 2005

A question increasingly raised in recent years is whether the trend towards longer life expectancy has been accompanied by comparable increases in the expectancy of life in good health (active or disability-free life expectancy). Formulating an answer to this question is of essential importance for projecting health expenditure and for forecasting retirement patterns over the coming decades. The AGIR research project aimed essentially at exploring all available information to illustrate whether people are not only living longer but also ageing in better health.

01 July 2005

This study aims at highlighting the importance of social integration for the wellbeing of dependent elderly persons living at home. This question is important because, as we can observe, social activities are not a priority for social policies regarding the dependent elderly in Europe. Here it is shown that social activities and contacts improve the wellbeing of the dependent elderly.

01 July 2005

This paper uses the European Community Household Panel (ECHP) to analyse the relationship between the dynamics of labour force participation and informal care to the elderly for a sample of women aged 20-59 across 13 European countries. The analysis has two focal points: the relative contributions of state dependence as well as observed and unobserved heterogeneity in explaining the dynamics in women’s labour force participation and the existence and consequences of non-random attrition from the ECHP.

01 April 2005

This paper studies the effect of individual and spousal characteristics on the labour force participation of individuals living in elderly two-adult households. The comparative approach taken here studies men and women separately and uses the first eight waves (1994-2001) of the European Community Household Panel (ECHP). We compare results of three countries: Finland (a country with a high degree of women’s labour force participation), Belgium and Germany (countries where women’s labour force participation is relatively low).

01 March 2005

This paper documents the financial consequences of widowhood using both cross-section and panel data from the European Community Household Panel. The research reveals that there are large differences across countries. For example, widowed persons in Greece and Portugal have the lowest income – less than a half that of those widowed in Austria. Cross-country differences decrease somewhat if we consider household income net of housing costs, owing to the higher share of home ownership in low-income countries.

01 February 2005

This study deals with the impact of ageing populations and changes in their health status on health care and the utilisation of long-term care services. Two kinds of projection methods have been used to estimate increases up to 2050 in the number of hospital cases and days, contacts with doctors, long-term care recipients and severely hampered persons for Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Spain and the UK.

01 September 2004

Over the last two decades, EU institutions have been increasingly concerned with the issues of unemployment reduction and job creation. The EU has recommended that member states develop welfare systems that moderate the negative effects of market relationships on the one hand, and enhance the efficiency of market performance on the other.

01 July 2004

During the coming decades the European Union and, indeed, large parts of the world, will be confronted with unprecedented demographic changes, generally characterised as ‘ageing of the population’. In reality, ageing is the combined outcome of two distinct phenomena: firstly the secular decline in mortality and the resulting increase in life expectancy and secondly the pronounced decline in fertility since 1970 in most European countries and which followed the baby boom in the first post-war decade.

01 July 2004

Among the working-age population, one of the most damaging individual experiences is unemployment. Many previous studies have confirmed the devastating effects of unemployment on individual well-being, both pecuniary and non-pecuniary. Using the data from the European Community Household Panel survey, this paper examines the factors that affect unemployed workers’ well-being with respect to their situations in their main vocational activity, income, housing, leisure time and health in Europe.

01 July 2004

If the hypothesis that people live longer and in better health is true, it could be expected that the changes in the health of the elderly have important consequences for the further demand for health services, the need for long-term care and also for the development of health expenditures. But other trends could also be essential to determining the extent and structure of the demand for health care and health expenditures. In the case of long-term care, there are other important effects that concern the structure of health care and institutional settings.

01 May 2004

The portability of pension rights across EU member states remains subject to a number of administrative, social and financial barriers. Incompatibility of pension schemes is a major headache for human resource managers throughout Europe and affects the mobility of the labour force. With financial support from the European Commission, CEPS organised an exploratory workshop in 2003 to stimulate discussion among experts, formulate proposals for legislative action and establish a research agenda to influence progress on this important issue.

01 April 2004

Among the big issues facing the EU is the declining working-age population and the effect this decline will have on our economies, businesses and social welfare systems. One way to address this issue is to promote labour mobility throughout the EU. The CEPS-ECHR (European Club for Human Resources) Task Force – chaired by Allan Larsson, former Director-General of DG Employment and Social Affairs – presents its recommendations for a more flexible and secure labour market in this report.

01 April 2004

This paper presents a discussion of some general conceptual and empirical issues of increasing importance for the analysis of the consequences of ageing: the potential trade-off between ensuring informal health care for the elderly and at the same time achieving an increase in the employment participation ratio for women. It first provides an overview of some general issues in health economics and then turns to some theoretical and empirical investigations of these issues.

01 December 2003

Ageing affects individuals and nations everywhere. But a precise definition of what ageing is cannot be provided easily with regard to health aspects, social conventions and lifestyles that are intertwined with the ageing process. As a first step, the ENEPRI AGIR project has attempted to describe this process in EU countries by observing as many dimensions as possible related to it. This summarises and compares the demographic experience of ten EU countries since the mid-20th century on the basis of the detailed data gathered within the project.

01 April 2003

Incompatibility of pension schemes in the different EU member states is major headache for human resource managers across Europe. The lack of pension portability is a source of additional costs for European enterprises, and mobile employees face a bewildering web of pension rights. Removing obstacles to pension portability within the EU should not only reduce these costs, but support labour mobility and increase revenues from occupational pension schemes through greater competition. Ultimately, it fosters the possibility of a pan-European pension fund for all staff members.